CISM O-Regulations
Reglement fra 2005
CISM O-Regulations

SPECIFIC REGULATIONS FOR ORIENTEERING

INTRODUCTION

All the first part of the 20th century the Orienteering was a typical Scandinavian sport. Since then

there has been an important growth of the Orienteering as a competition sport all over the world.

The Orienteering is one of our youngest military sports. In 1965 the first championship was

organised by Sweden. Its success is increasing.

The success of Orienteering in CISM is explained by the advantages derived from Orienteering's

practice in the military formation.

Orienteering is a sport in which the competitor visits a number of points marked on the ground,

controls, in the shortest possible time aided by map and compass. The term competitor means an

individual of either sex or team, as appropriate.

The Orienteering-competitor needs:

- high physical qualities (endurance, strength and sturdiness to run in the forest),

- a perfect exploiting of the map,

1 REGULATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION

The latest rules, especially the

"Competition Rules for IOF Foot Orienteering Events" of the

International Orienteering Federation (IOF) apply in principle, except for the provisions included

in these regulations.

One of the TC members will also be a contact person to the IOF.

2 PARTICIPATION - COMPOSITION OF A MISSION

2.1 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

2.1.1 TOTAL NUMBER

The mission of a country taking part in the world championships may include a maximum of 14

persons:

- 1 chief of mission

- 1 team captain

- 1 coach/trainer/ad libitum

- 7 male runners

- 4 female runners

- 14 total

No more members may be included in a mission without the specific authorisation of the

organising country.

2.1.2 MALE CHAMPIONSHIP

In the individual male championship and team championship each mission may enter a maximum

of 7 runners.

2.1.3 FEMALE CHAMPIONSHIP

In the individual female championship and team championship each mission may enter a

maximum of 4 runners.

2.1.4 RELAY CHAMPIONSHIP

In the relay championship for men each mission may enter 2 teams of 3

2.1.5 REPLACEMENTS

The chief of mission, the team captain or the coach/trainer/ad libitum may replace a runner in case

of "valid reasons", as defined in the IOF rules.

2.2 CONTINENTAL AND REGIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS

No specific regulations.

(The organiser shall contact the TC to discuss)

2.3 TOURNAMENTS

No specific regulations.

(The organiser shall contact the TC to discuss)

2.4 CLINICS

No specific regulations.

(The organiser shall contact the TC to discuss)

3 COMPETITION PROGRAMME (MEN AND WOMEN)

Individual middle distance.

Individual long distance.

Team competition (based on both individual competitions).

Relay competition.

4 EVENT PROGRAMME

The minimum duration of the stay is 5 full days:

1st day: Arrival of missions Monday normally

2nd day: Model event Tuesday

Preliminary meeting/Technical meeting

Opening ceremony

3rd day: Middle distance Wednesday

4th day: Long distance Thursday

5th day: Free (sightseeing etc) Friday

TC Enlarged Meeting

6th day: Relay Saturday

Closing ceremony

Banquet

7th day: Departure of missions Sunday

The organising country may, in co-operation with the TC President, set the opening and closing

ceremonies on other days than those outlined in the above-mentioned programme.

5 DRAWING OF LOTS

5.1 STARTING ORDER

The starting order for the individual races shall be drawn the day before the run. The drawing of

lots will be checked by the Event Advisor

.

For the individual races groups of runners including a maximum of 1 runner from each mission are

constituted. The number of groups corresponds to the maximum number of runners allowed to run

from each mission (see art 2.1.2 and 2.1.3.).

Example: If 7 runners per mission may participate, 7 groups are constituted, numbered 1-7. Groups

start according to their number (1, 2, 3 etc).

Before the drawing the team captains place their runners in the groups at their own choice. In each

group the starting order is fixed by drawing of lots.

The drawing must avoid consecutive starts by runners from the same mission.

At least 2 runners

from another mission must separate them.

The relay shall be organised in such a way that the teams of the 4 best missions in the team placing

at the current year's championship and the 2 teams of each mission will have as different

relay-course-combinations as possible.

6 SPORTS REGULATIONS: SPECIFIC

6.1 START INTERVAL

Middle distance men and women: 2 minutes

Long distance men: 1 minute

Long distance women: 2 minutes

6.2 BASIS TIMES OF THE RACES

The courses shall be worked out on the basis of the following expected winning times:

Men Women

Middle distance 25 minutes 25 minutes

Long distance 75 minutes 50 minutes

Relay legs 40 minutes 30 minutes

6.3 DISPERSION

Men Women

Middle distance No No

Long distance Yes No

Relay Yes Yes

6.4 CLASSIFICATIONS

6.4.1 INDIVIDUAL

Individual placings (men and women) for each of the individual races.

6.4.2 TEAM PLACINGS

6.4.2.1 MEN

The score is calculated by adding the 4 best times achieved in the middle distance and the 4 best

times in the long distance.

6.4.2.2 WOMEN

The score is calculated by adding the 3 best times achieved in the middle distance and the 3 best

times in the long distance.

6.4.2.3 TIE

In case of a tie between teams, placings will be determined on the basis of the best individual

combined result (middle and long added), then second best etc.

6.4.3 RELAY

Placings for the relay (relay championship) are established by the places of the 3rd (4th) runners.

The individual times of all runners are given in the results.

6.5 RESULTS

Provisional placings will be calculated at the conclusion of each race and provided to the missions

without delay. A scoreboard at the finish may be used to this end.

Final placings will be established as rapidly as possible, quoting intermediate times at each control

in the individual races. At least 2 copies more than the number of participants in the mission,

together with maps, will be handed out to the missions or sent to the delegations.

6.6 EVENT ADVISOR (EA)

WMOC shall be controlled by an Event Advisor (EA). The EA will be appointed by the TC

President.

The EA is the official representative and is subordinate to the TC President.

The organiser shall always appoint a controller. This controller shall assist the EA.

The EA shall help the TC President to ensure that rules are followed, mistakes are avoided and that

fairness is paramount. The TC President and the EA have the authority to require adjustments to be

made if he or she deems them necessary to satisfy the requirements of the event.

The EA shall work in close collaboration with the organiser, and shall be given all relevant

information. All official information sent to federations (“bulletins”), shall be approved by the EA.

The EA shall make as many controlling visits as necessary. The visits shall be planned in

agreement with the TC President and the organiser.

The following tasks shall be carried out under the authority of the EA:

Initial planning

1to approve the venue and the terrain for the event

to look into the event organisation and assess the suitability of the proposed

accommodation, food, transport, programme and training possibilities.

Main tasks

- to check that the map confirms with IOF-standards

- to approve the courses after assessing their quality, including degree of difficulty, control

sitings and equipment, chance factors and map correctness

- to check any course splitting method and course combinations

- to approve the organisation and layout of start, finish and changeover areas

- to assess the reliability and accuracy of the time-keeping and result producing systems

(including punching-system)

- check that the model event corresponds to 2 and 3 above.

- The costs of travels to and from the organising country will be the responsibility of the EA’s country.
- The cost of travel board and lodging within the organising country will be the responsibility of the organising country.

6.7 TECHNICAL JURY

The Technical Jury is composed exclusively of military

personnel with special knowledge in

orienteering matters. The President of the Jury is the acting President of the TC.

Under no circumstances can any one belonging to the Organising Committee be a member of the

Technical Jury or the Jury of Appeal.

4 members are chosen among the members of different participating missions and appointed

during the preliminary meeting. Should there be more than 4 candidates, they are chosen by

drawing of lots.

When necessary the Technical Jury makes sure that the regulations are properly followed during

the championship.

It controls and approves the results.

Any protest must be submitted in writing to the President of the Technical Jury, signed by the chief of mission or by a member of the Jury.

Usually by the TC President and the EA during the first planning visit.

The Technical Jury rules on all protests received in accordance with IOF and CISM regulations.

It hands over to the Official CISM representative, for transmission to the General Secretariat, the

original of the protests as well as the decisions taken.

6.8 OFFICIAL MEETINGS

The official meetings during the championship are:

-The preliminary meeting followed by the technical meeting

-Meetings of the Jury of Appeal and the Technical Jury

-The TC Enlarged Meeting

-Internal meeting(s) of the TC.

7 ANTI DOPING CONTROLS

7.1

Doping is defined as

- the presence of prohibited substances or its metabolites or markers in an athletes bodily

specimen

- the use or the attempted use of a prohibited substance or a prohibited method

- the refusing, or failing without compelling justification to submit to sample collection

after notification

7.2

Doping, according to this definition, is strictly for bidden in CISM, and especially in

Orienteering.

7.3

At least at each CISM Military World Orienteering Championship, if possible also at

other major events, anti- doping controls will be carried out according to the latest CISM

Anti Doping Regulation (Chapter IV, CISM Policy Manual) which is fully in line with

the Anti- Doping Code of WADA.

Specificities of the IOF Anti Doping Regulation will be considered when necessary.

7.4

The operative responsibilities of the anti- doping controls will lie with the Anti- Doping

Commission formed for the considered event.

The composition and tasks of this commission are defined in the CISM Anti Doping

Regulation

7.5

At World Military Orienteering Championships, at least five (5) tests will be carried out

without considering world records.

7.6

The list of prohibited substances and methods used for the anti- doping testing in CISM

events will always be the actual WADA list

9

8 TITLES AND AWARDS

8.1 TITLES WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS (MEN AND WOMEN)

8.1.1 INDIVIDUAL TITLE

"(Year) World Military Champion in Orienteering Middle Distance".

"(Year) World Military Champion in Orienteering Long Distance".

8.1.2 TEAM TITLE

"(Year) World Military Champion in Orienteering Team".

8.1.3 RELAY TITLE

"(Year) World Military Champion in Orienteering Relay Team".

8.2 AWARDS

8.2.1 OFFICIAL MEDALS

CISM official medals (Gold, Silver, Bronze) will be presented by the organising country,

-to the 3 best runners in the middle distance (men and women)

-to the 3 best runners in the long distance (men and women)

-to all runners having contributed to the times of the 3 best teams in the team championship, (men

and women)

-to the runners in the 3 best placed teams in the relay championship (men and women).

8.2.2 TROPHIES

Trophies, if any, will be awarded, when accepted by the TC.

8.2.3 PRIZES

Prizes, if any, will be awarded to the competitors best classified in the overall individual placings.

Leder CISM Orientering Harald Østbye til høyre.
Beskrivelse av Orientering
Short Description of Foot Orienteering

Foot orienteering is an endurance sport which involves a huge mental element. There is no marked route - the orienteer must navigate with map and compass while running. The map gives detailed information on the terrain such as hills, ground surface, obstacles etc. To be successful in foot orienteering, the athlete needs excellent map reading skills, absolute concentration and the ability to make quick decisions on the best route while running at high speed.

Orienteers run over rough ground, completely unprepared forest terrain or rough open hills - cross country in the true sense of the word. Therefore, considerable body strength and agility is needed. Fitness similar to that of a 3000m steeplechase or marathon runner is required.

There is a wide variety of orienteering events: individual competitions and relays, ultra-short park races and mountain marathon events. Night orienteering with the aid of a head lamp is also a popular form of orienteering.

In uneven numbered years, the best foot orienteers in the world fight for the World Champion titles, whilst the victory of the World Cup is at stake in even numbered years. The programme of the World Championships includes three competitions for both women and men; classic distance, short distance and relay.

Foot orienteering became a recognized Olympic sport in 1977.

Equipment:

RACING SUIT: A lightweight, stretchy suit protects from undergrowth whilst allowing maximum freedom of movement even if it gets soaking wet.

SHOES: Light, strong shoes with non-slip soles allow sure grip on all types of ground - including mud and bare rock.

MAP: The map provided by the organiser shows the course with the control points which must be visited. The map is designed to give detailed information on the terrain - hills, ground surface, and features such as boulders or cliffs.

COMPASS: There is a wide variety of sophisticated compasses to choose from. Basically they can be divided into two main categories: base plate and thumb compasses.

CONTROL CARD: To prove that they have visited all control points in the right order, the orienteers have to punch their control card at each control using an electronic device.