Weather review year around
JANUARY - DECEMBER

JANUARY
January is early in the Costa Rican dry season. The western and central regions of Costa Rica have little rain and mosly sunny weather.  What little rain falls usually comes as afternoon or evening showers. 
On the Caribbean side of the central mountains it's wetter especially in the northeast where polar air pushes across the Gulf of Mexico picking up heat and moisture then depositing it as continous days of rain referred to locally as temporales del Atlantico.
The beaches and lowlands experience high temperatures in the seventies to mid-eighties and  low temperatures in the sixties to mid seventies.  Mid elevations (e.g. around San José) are 5-10 degrees cooler and temperatures at high elevations (Monteverde and Chirripo) can be 20 or even 30 degrees lower.

 

FEBRUARY
February is the Costa Rican dry season. The western and central regions of Costa Rica have sunny weather and nearly no rain.  What little rain falls usually comes as afternoon or evening showers. 
It's wetter on the Caribbean side of the central mountains and the likelyhood of temporales del Atlantico (polar air pushes across the Gulf of Mexico picking up heat and moisture then deposits it as continous days of rain) is still fairly high.
The beaches and lowlands experience high temperatures in the seventies to mid-eighties and  low temperatures in the sixties to mid seventies.  Mid elevations (e.g. around San José) are 5-10 degrees cooler and temperatures at high elevations (Monteverde and Chirripo) can be 20 or even 30 degrees lower.


MARCH
March is the the heart of the Costa Rican dry season. The western and central regions of Costa Rica have sunny weather and nearly no rain.  What little rain falls usually comes as afternoon or evening showers.
March is also one of the driest months on the Caribbean coast.
The beaches and lowlands experience high temperatures in the seventies to mid-eighties and  low temperatures in the sixties to mid seventies.  Mid elevations (e.g. around San José) are 5-10 degrees cooler and temperatures at high elevations (Monteverde and Chirripo) can be 20 or even 30 degrees lower.


APRIL
April is the Costa Rican dry season. The western and central regions of Costa Rica have nearly no rain and mosly sunny weather.  What little rain falls usually comes as afternoon or evening showers. 
April is also one of the driest months on the Caribbean side.
The beaches and lowlands experience high temperatures in the seventies to mid-eighties and  low temperatures in the sixties to mid seventies.  Mid elevations (e.g. around San José) are 5-10 degrees cooler and temperatures at high elevations (Monteverde and Chirripo) can be 20 or even 30 degrees lower.


MAY
By late May rainy season weather patterns are once again prevailing, but there is still plenty of beach weather. 
The rains begin earlier on the Caribbean side of the central mountains and it's generally wetter, but rather than the continous days of rain possible with the temporales del Atlantico in November through January afternoon and overnight showers are more common in May.
The beaches and lowlands experience high temperatures in the high-seventies to high-eighties and  low temperatures in the high-sixties to mid seventies.  Mid elevations (e.g. around San José) are 5-10 degrees cooler and temperatures at high elevations (Monteverde and Chirripo) can be 20 or even 30 degrees lower.


JUNE
June is one of the wetter months all over Costa Rica and particularily for the Pacific coast.  However, the majority of the rain falls as afternoon or evening showers. 
The Caribbean side is solidly in the rainy season as well, but afternoon and overnight showers are more common than the continous days of rain possible with the temporales del Atlantico in November through January.
The beaches and lowlands experience high temperatures in the high-seventies to low-nineties and  low temperatures in the high-sixties to mid seventies.  Mid elevations (e.g. around San José) are 5-10 degrees cooler and temperatures at high elevations (Monteverde and Chirripo) can be 20 or even 30 degrees lower.


JULY
July (2007) was one of the wettest on record. Rainfalls nearly double the normal average in some regions of the north and northeast washed out dozens of bridges. Five vacationers died in flash flooding while rappelling a waterfall in the mountains and another was struck by lightning and died while swimming in the Pacific.
July is typically one of the wetter months all over Costa Rica however, especially on the Pacific coast the majority of the rain falls as afternoon or evening showers. 
The Caribbean side is solidly in the rainy season and very heavy rain is common especially in the north.
Most years (exceptions are usually correlated with El Niño) Costa Rica experiences a short mid-year mini-dry season towards the end of July and begining of August when rainfall decreases significantly for three or four weeks especially in the northern Pacific.  Ticos call this the veranillo or little summer .
The beaches and lowlands experience high temperatures in the low-eighties to nineties and  low temperatures in the high-sixties to mid seventies.  Mid elevations (e.g. around San José) are 5-10 degrees cooler and temperatures at high elevations (Monteverde and Chirripo) can be 20 or even 30 degrees lower.


AUGUST
August is typically one of the wetter months all over Costa Rica however, especially on the Pacific coast the majority of the rain falls as afternoon or evening showers. 
The Caribbean side is solidly in the rainy season.
The beaches and lowlands experience high temperatures in the low-eighties to nineties and  low temperatures in the high-sixties to mid seventies.  Mid elevations (e.g. around San José) are 5-10 degrees cooler and temperatures at high elevations (Monteverde and Chirripo) can be 20 or even 30 degrees lower.


SEPTEMBER
September is one of the rainiest months of the year on the Pacific side of Costa Rica.  The northern and central beaches and mountains get significant rain most days, but still typically enjoy the pattern of sunny mornings and days with most of the showers in the afternoon or evening.
The southern Pacific and Osa peninsula are inundated by days or even weeks of continuous rainfall driven by westerly winds and referred to as temporales del Pacífico. Rain is measured in feet rather than inches.  Many of the lodges and tour operators are closed until November. 
The Caribbean side of the central mountains get a reprieve in September and October as the Talamanca mountains force the moisture out of the westerly winds bringing clear weather especially in the southern Atlantic beach areas of Cahuita, Puerto Viejo and Manzanillo.


OCTOBER
October is one of the rainiest months of the year on the Pacific side of Costa Rica.  The northern and central beaches and mountains get significant rain most days, but still typically enjoy the pattern of sunny mornings and days with most of the showers in the afternoon or evening.
The southern Pacific and Osa peninsula are inundated by days or even weeks of continuous rainfall driven by westerly winds and referred to as temporales del Pacífico. Rain is measured in feet rather than inches.  Many of the lodges and tour operators are closed until November. 


NOVEMBER
Early November is rainy on the Pacific side of Costa Rica.  The northern and central beaches and mountains get significant rain some days, but still typically enjoy the pattern of sunny mornings and days with most of the showers in the afternoon or evening.
Early in the month the southern Pacific and Osa peninsula are still quite wet as the temporales del Pacífico continue. Lodges and tour operators start to resume operations as the weather begins to dry towards the end of the month. 
The southern Caribbean side (Cahuita, Puerto Viejo and Manzanillo) is still slightly drier, but as you move north towards Tortuguero the rains intensify.


DECEMBER
December is early in the Costa Rican dry season. The western and central regions of Costa Rica have little rain and mosly sunny weather.  What little rain falls usually comes as afternoon or evening showers. 
On the Caribbean side of the central mountains it's wetter especially in the northeast where polar air pushes across the Gulf of Mexico picking up heat and moisture then depositing it as continous days of rain refered to locally as temporales del Atlantico.
The beaches and lowlands experience high temperatures in the seventies to mid-eighties and  low temperatures in the sixties to mid seventies.  Mid elevations (e.g. around San José) are 5-10 degrees cooler and temperatures at high elevations (Monteverde and Chirripo) can be 20 or even 30 degrees lower.


(Source: Costa Rica Guide)

 

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